"

I.
We crawled out of our mother’s womb
and we were the same.
A pair of fragile little animals,
pink and wet, blind like kittens.
But we had royal blood.
But we were children.

II.
My hair grew long, black, glowing.
A tangle of snakes poised to strike.
My brother’s hair grew, too. Thick
silky fur all over his body.
I envied him. He was always warm.
I slept curled in his soft arms
while the north wind screamed
and the sea bit into the shores.

III.
I grew: a soft bosom, a beautiful face.
An army of suitors befitting the princess.
My brother grew: a pair of horns.
Sharp and curved. He was three
heads taller than any man.
I learnt to sing hymns to the gods
every full moon.
My brother forgot how to speak.

IV.
A prince doesn’t have horns.
A prince doesn’t howl in despair
for days and days, wordless.
We have seen twenty winters each.
I got new dresses and bracelets
of gold and silver and pearls.
My brother got a labyrinth.

V.
The word travelled.
Our mother: the whore.
My brother: the monster.
He lived in his labyrinth.
He ate human flesh now.
There was no other word.

VI.
One of the builders had kind eyes.
He left us a little window in the wall.
A hole the size of a fist.
Every night, I held my brother’s hand.
Sometimes it was wet and salty.
Sometimes it was wet and red.
“I’ll get you out,” I told the silence.
And, “I love you.”
And, “Brother. Beloved.”
In the winter, I slept alone
and my limbs were cold.
I didn’t care he devoured human flesh.
He held my hand every night.

VII.
The story goes like this:
I fell in love with a great hero.
I gave him a ball of thread.
I helped him slay the monster
and he promised to take me away.
The hero was the one who told
the story, not me.

VIII.
The great hero came to murder
my brother. I wanted to claw
his eyes out, but I made him
my messenger instead.
I gave him a sword, for my brother
was without a weapon save his horns.
I gave him a ball of thread, so my brother
could find his way back to me.

IX.
The story doesn’t say that I failed.
I have held my brother’s hand every night.
Misery slept in his arms in my stead.
The great hero emerged victorious:
with my thread and my sword
and my brother’s head.
The story says I sang with joy.
The story says I went with the hero
who saved us all from the monster.

X.
The story doesn’t say that I cried
until my heart became stone.
I cursed the hero with divine breath.
I laid down in the dust and kissed
my brother’s eyes, still wet and salty.
The finest Athenians stood around me
flushed with victory.
The hero left with no prize, save for
eternal glory and my tears.
He left without looking back.

XI.
The hero stood on the deck of his ship
and looked upon his proud city on the
horizon. He could not raise a white sail.
I had wrapped my brother’s head in it.
The stolen cloth was no longer white.
It left red kisses on my blankets.
I slept curled around it
and my limbs remained cold.

XI.
I wasn’t surprised when the hair
started growing thick and black
on my arms, my legs, my bosom.
I was next in line.
I took the sword, the thread, the head.
I walked into the labyrinth.
I waited for another
foolish hero.

"

— Ariadne Twists Her Thread. Copyright Dali Regent, October 2014.

hightimeslowtides:

emilygt:

dinosaurs-on-wheels:

where can I uninstall my period

i think if you download pregnancy it blocks it for a few months but then you get a really annoying loud pop up that doesn’t go away for 18 years

omg

image

(via mojoflower)

haliameguid:

I had a request yesterday to do something in a Southern Gothic vein. This is one of my favorite songs. It’s an old traditional, best known for featuring in the film O Brother, Where Art Thou? It’s creepy, sexy, and a little bit hellish - the best tunes always are. Enjoy. 

DIDN’T LEAVE NOBODY BUT THE BABY (Traditional) 

go to sleep little babe
go to sleep little babe

your momma’s gone away and your daddy’s gonna stay
didn’t leave nobody but the baby

go to sleep little babe
go to sleep little babe

everybody’s gone in the cotton and the corn
didn’t leave nobody but the baby

you’re a sweet little babe
you’re a sweet little babe

honey on the rock and the sugar don’t stop
gonna bring a bottle to the baby

don’t you weep pretty babe
don’t you weep pretty babe

she’s long gone with her red shoes on
gonna need another loving babe

don’t you weep pretty babe
don’t you weep pretty babe

you and me and the devil makes three
don’t need no other lovin’ babe

go to sleep little babe
go to sleep little babe

come lay your bones on the alabaster stones
and be my everlovin’ baby

radical activism 101: nothing says empowerment like slamming down somebody else

dailynietzsche:

“Men have so far treated women like birds who had strayed to them from some height, as something more refined and vulnerable, wilder and stranger, sweeter and more soulful, yet as something one has to lock up lest it fly away.

—F. Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, §237a (edited).

wouldya look at that, even Nietzsche gets it

accurate

thescienceofjohnlock:

I just found this on YouTube! (Fandom beyond Tumblr)

So witty, so incredibly true! 

Also note this other frozenlock song: Do you Want to Solve a Mystery?

i’m fucking crying

webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.
She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.
She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.
After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.

She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.

She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.

After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

(via ichijoukurou)

plot twist: a world-weary female cop does all kinds of stupid unsafe shit while her sensible husband begs her to be careful and takes care of their kids all on his own

gaywrites:

The first day of marriage equality in Idaho. My heart is so happy. (via BuzzFeed LGBT)